2018 tax brackets for singles

For those who aren't married and can't file as head of household or a qualifying widow or widower, here are the brackets for 2018.

Bracket

Tax is this amount plus this percentage

Of the amount over

$0 to $9,525

$0 plus 10%

$0

$9,525 to $38,700

$952.50 plus 12%

$9,525

$38,700 to $82,500

$4,453.50 plus 22%

$38,700

$82,500 to $157,500

$14,089.50 plus 24%

$82,500

$157,500 to $200,000

$32,089.50 plus 32%

$157,500

$200,000 to $500,000

$45,689.50 plus 35%

$200,000

Above $500,000

$150,689.50 plus 37%

$500,000

Data source: IRS.

2018 tax brackets for heads of household

If you're not married, then you can qualify as head of household if you support a child, parent, or other relative who lives with you more than half the year and meets certain other qualifications. It's often necessary for you to claim qualifying persons as dependents. Heads of household get the wider brackets below, although notice that the upper-income brackets don't provide any additional benefit, which is different from previous law.

Bracket

Tax is this amount plus this percentage

Of the amount over

$0 to $13,600

$0 plus 10%

$0

$13,600 to $51,850

$1,360 plus 12%

$13,600

$51,850 to $82,500

$5,944 plus 22%

$51,850

$82,500 to $157,500

$12,698 plus 24%

$82,500

$157,500 to $200,000

$30,698 plus 32%

$157,500

$200,000 to $500,000

$44,298 plus 35%

$200,000

Above $500,000

$149,298 plus 37%

$500,000

Data source: IRS.

2018 tax brackets for married joint filers

Joint filers will pay the following rates. Note that the marriage penalty has been removed from all but the top two brackets.

Bracket

Tax is this amount plus this percentage

Of the amount over

$0 to $19,050

$0 plus 10%

$0

$19,050 to $77,400

$1,905 plus 12%

$19,050

$77,400 to $165,000

$8,907 plus 22%

$77,400

$165,000 to $315,000

$28,179 plus 24%

$165,000

$315,000 to $400,000

$64,179 plus 32%

$315,000

$400,000 to $600,000

$91,379 plus 35%

$400,000

Above $600,000

$161,379 plus 37%

$600,000

Data source: IRS.

2018 tax brackets for married separate filers

Under tax reform, most of the brackets for those who are married and file separately are the same as for singles. The one difference is that the top bracket starts at $300,000 rather than $600,000.

Bracket

Tax is this amount plus this percentage

Of the amount over

$0 to $9,525

$0 plus 10%

$0

$9,525 to $38,700

$952.50 plus 12%

$9,525

$38,700 to $82,500

$4,453.50 plus 22%

$38,700

$82,500 to $157,500

$14,089.50 plus 24%

$82,500

$157,500 to $200,000

$32,089.50 plus 32%

$157,500

$200,000 to $300,000

$45,689.50 plus 35%

$200,000

Above $300,000

$80,689.50 plus 37%

$300,000

2018 Personal Exemption Amounts

For tax year 2018, the personal exemption amount is eliminated.


2018 Standard Deduction Amounts

There are two main types of tax deductions: the standard deduction and itemized deductions. You can claim one type of deduction on your tax return, but not both.

For example, if you claim the standard deduction, you cannot itemize deductions – and vice versa (if you itemize deductions, you cannot claim the standard deduction). You are allowed to use whichever type of deduction results in the lowest tax.

The standard deduction is subtracted from your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI), thereby reducing your taxable income. For tax year 2018 the standard deduction amounts are as follows:

Filing Status Standard Deduction
Single $12,000
Married Filing Jointly $24,000
Married Filing Separately $12,000
Head of Household $18,000
Qualifying Widow(er) $24,000